Hidden Newfoundland takes an informative look at a variety of lesser known attractions, curiosities, and locations on the island of Newfoundland.  With 500 years of European History, 9000 years of aboriginal history, and 500 million years of geologic history there is no shortage of places to explore and adventure to be had on the island.   

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Explore the Unexplored

HiddenNewfoundland began as an urban exploring website and that was dedicated to sharing photos and information on various abandoned locations across the province. But Newfoundland has more to offer than just a unique variety of abandoned buildings and I decided to expand the scope to encompass everything hidden and lesser known. The locations described in the following pages will give you a sense of awe and wonder, places that are rich with history and make for a great story, most of which are known by few. 

 

HiddenNewfoundland.ca combines adventure with history and exploration to provide a database and bucket list for all those wanting more than just the average tourist destination. 

HiddenNewfoundland's most popular locations . . .

Burgoynes Cove B-36 Crash Site

Burgoynes Cove B-36 Crash Site

While on a test mission to secretly infiltrate the Air Defence system in North America, General Richard Ellsworth’s RB-36H aircraft crashed after being pushed off course, ran into a mountain near Random Island on Trinity Bay.

Abandoned Argentia Naval Base

Abandoned Argentia Naval Base

Between 1941 and 1994 the United States operated a strategic military base on a large flat piece of land that extended out into Placentia Bay near the community of Placentia. This Naval Air base was one of the largest military bases built by the Americans during World War II. The base consisted of a large airfield, dockyard, submarine base as well as an Army base known as Fort McAndrew.

Glovertown Mill

Glovertown Mill

After falling into financial troubles in the early 1920s, the Terra Nova Sulphite Company was forced to stop construction on their nearly completed pulp mill. It wasn’t long after that the mill gained the attention of the Anglo-Newfoundland Development Company (AND Co). The company quickly finished the mill and shipped in 1300 cords of wood to test the mills machinery and production rate.

Lomond Sinkhole

Lomond Sinkhole

Located in the back country of the islands west coast, is a 30 metre deep, 45 metre wide sinkhole. A small brook flows off the top of the hole and falls nearly 100 feet to the bottom before disappearing into the rocks below. Over the last several years the Sinkhole has become a very popular spot for snowmobilers and off-road enthusiast.

Campbellton Pulp Mill and Dam

Campbellton Pulp Mill and Dam

Located in Campbellton is what remains of the Horwood Lumber Company Pulp Mill and power house. The mill was built between 1911 and 1913 by the Horwood Lumber Company. The company owned many sawmills in the area and had already owned 370 square kilometers of timber licenses for the surrounding area. In 1911 the Horwood Lumber Company also obtained a hydro lease in order to build a hydroelectric dam on Indian Arm Brook.

Janeway Hostel

Janeway Hostel

In 1982 the St. Johns Northwest Rotary Club raised 2.5 million dollars to build the Rotary-Janeway Hostel located just across the street from the old Janeway Childrens Hosipital. The hostel provided parents and families visiting their children and loved ones a cheap and close place to stay. Today the building lies abandoned in the east end of St. John's.

The Wreck of the HMS Calypso

The Wreck of the HMS Calypso

The rusted hull and some wooden decking is all that remains of the HMS Calypso (later renamed HMS Briton). The 71.6 metre long, 13.6 metre wide ship was one of the last British sailing corvettes when it was built in 1883. In 1902 the ship was purchased by the Newfoundland Royal Naval Reserve where it was used a training vessel. Her end came when she was towed to the community of Embree and burned.

Red Cliff Radar Station

Red Cliff Radar Station

Shortly after WWII, the Cold War was in full force and out of fear of invasion or attack, the United States Air Force (with help from the Royal Canadian Air Force) began building a number of radar stations roughly along the 50th parallel. These radar stations were known as the Pine Tree Line. In 1951 an area 10 km north of St. John's was chosen as a site for one of these sites.

Help Us Expand!

Hidden newfoundland is built on the basis of hidden locations that few people know about. While there are exceptions, many of the places on here are only known by the locals that live nearby. Whether that be a swimming hole or an abandoned house, everyone has a hidden spot to share. Its difficult to find all of these locations and because of this I ask for your help!

If you know of a hidden place and want to share, send us an email at:

Learn more about Hidden Newfoundland's mission and history.

Learn more about Newfoundland with these recommended sources.

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Disclaimer: HiddenNewfoundland is not responsible for any injuries, legalities or deaths from tips or advice from this website.  Be advised that many trips on this site are dangerous and not safe to explore.  You are going at your own risk. Proper knowledge and safety measures must be taken at all times when exploring any of these sites.

All photos that are not referenced to a source are owned by the author or have been given to the author for use. 

Copyright © 2016 HiddenNewfoundland.ca